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Do I know anyone (I suspect at least one) who knows much about non-Western story structures? Especially related to story organization? I recently saw a thing talking about the 3-act structure that talked about its origin in ancient Greek plays and it made me wonder about traditions that weren’t (so) influenced by Greece back then.

@benhamill how much is “much”? I know some, but I wouldn’t count myself as an expert. I know quite a lot about dramaturgy and dramaturgical models (which is basically how to build stories), though.

@lilletale "Much" is, like, a very low bar. So, like, many US educational institutions treat the 3-act structure as if it is inherent to human stories, like a natural law. But it originates in ancient Greek theory about plays and looking at ancient Greek plays. So I wondered if other cultures had arrived at similar places or wildly different.

@benhamill If you're looking for examples of non Western story structures, you could watch some Studio Ghibli films. My cousin Totoro or Howl's moving castle for example. I don't know the theory, but it's pretty clear these films don't follow the expected Western story structures.

@loveisanalogue @benhamill Some years past I read a little about the Japanese (or Asian more generally?) four-act story structure, which is possibly what these Ghibli films use.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kishōten

@benhamill The 3-act maybe has its origins in classic Greece (as many other things), but the 3-act storytelling that has monopolized Hollywood (and Hollywood-influenced) cinema for the last decades is basically a very recent thing, and its major influence is this book: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Screenpl

You'll find a various set of different storytelling structures both in Western and non-Western literature or cinema.

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Une instance se voulant accueillante pour les personnes queers, féministes et anarchistes ainsi que pour leurs sympathisant·e·s. Nous sommes principalement francophones, mais vous êtes les bienvenu·e·s quelle que soit votre langue.

A welcoming instance for queer, feminist and anarchist people as well as their sympathizers. We are mainly French-speaking people, but you are welcome whatever your language might be.