@dredmorbius @kick @enkiv2 @freakazoid
If you mean ! as in the routing control, isn't that even worse? We probably want to specify *less* irrelevant information by default.

@enkiv2 Bang simply as available notation. Now that I think of it, it might make a good routing _mechanism_ specifier:

!<specifier>=<key>

http://!<specifier>=<key>/<local-part>

Again, I'm not sure this is better than individual protocols.

Another option would be to specify some service proxy, which could then handle routing. URI encoding doesn't seem to directly provide that, apps/processes define own proxy use.

@kick @freakazoid

@dredmorbius @enkiv2 @kick @freakazoid
Bang was used in usenet addresses to separate a series of hosts in order to specify a routing, since UUCP would be done by machines calling specific other known machines nightly over landline phones. You'd see bang routing in usenet archives as late as the early 90s. I'd be surprised if it's not still theoretically supported in URLs.

@enkiv2 Email also.

I used (though understood poorly) bang-path routing at the time.

So yes, I'm familiar with the usage and notation. The question of whether or not it's appropriate here is ... the question.

At present, HTTP URL's *presume* DNS.

The problem is that DNS itself is proving problematic in numerous ways, that ... don't seem reasonably tractable. The dot-org fiasco is pretty much the argument I've been looking for against the "just host your own domain" line.

@kick @freakazoid

@enkiv2 That's at best worked with difficulty for large organisations -- domain lapses, etc., occur with regularity.

Domain squatting, typosquatting, and a whole mess of other stuff, is a long-standing issue.

In that light, Google's killing the URL _might_ not be _all_ bad, but they've been Less Than Clear on what their suggested alternative is. And I trust them less far than I can throw them.

For individuals, the issues of persistent online space is a huge issue.

@kick @freakazoid

@enkiv2 Then there's the whole question of how many spaces is enough. There are arguments for _both_ persistence _and_ flexibility / alternatives, and locking everyone into a _single_ permanent identity generally Does Not End Well.

The notion of a time-indexed identity might address some of this. Internet Archive's done some work in this area. Assumptions of network immutability tend to break. In time.

@kick @freakazoid

@dredmorbius @enkiv2 @kick @freakazoid
Yeah. Any immutability needs to be enforced because when the W3C declared that changing web pages is Very Rude all the scam artists & incompetents did it anyway. Content archival projects like waybackmachine become easier if you have static addresses for static content & some kind of mechanism to repoint at a different set of static documents (like IPFS+IPNS).

@enkiv2 I'd argue that there's a place for redacting content -- see the Bryan Cantril thread from 1996 previously referenced. That's ... embarassing. Not particularly useful, though perhaps as a cautionary tale.

There's a strong argument that most social media should be fairly ephemeral and reach-limited.

There are exceptions, and *both* promiting *and* concealing information can be done for good OR evil.

@kick @freakazoid

@dredmorbius @enkiv2 @kick @freakazoid
In terms of negative feedback -- I don't consider redaction of already-published material to be the best or most useful form. We see problems that could be solved by this, if mirroring & wayback machine & screenshots didn't exist. I'm more hopeful about solving the dunking problem with norms.
Reach is a lot more nuanced & powerful. Permanent & reach-limited like SSB feels like the right thing for nominally-public stuff.

@enkiv2 For ordinary citizens, the ability to unpublish / recall content seems fair -- that's the EU's RTBF.

For organisations, governments, highly significant individuals, criminals, and others with significant social obligation or power, the ability to capriciously unpublish is much more problematic.

The nature of online communications makes what were previously _streams_ into _records_, which can have tremendous durability. Everthing needn't last forever.

@kick @freakazoid

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@dredmorbius @enkiv2 @kick @freakazoid
I find RTBF problematic because it's not very useful in the absence of norms against personal archiving (itself a problematic thing). We're better off developing norms about carefully checking the context around claims of wrongdoing before acting on or spreading those claims -- something that becomes easier when public information cannot be modified after publication. That's a tangent even by the standards of this thread tho

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Eldritch Café

Une instance se voulant accueillante pour les personnes queers, féministes et anarchistes ainsi que pour leurs sympathisant·e·s. Nous sommes principalement francophones, mais vous êtes les bienvenu·e·s quelle que soit votre langue.

A welcoming instance for queer, feminist and anarchist people as well as their sympathizers. We are mainly French-speaking people, but you are welcome whatever your language might be.