A lot of people are confused by git. Most of these people, I reckon, learned it from the outside in - from the command-line interface down. If you started with git by asking "how do I sync up my changes with my peers", then you might get the answer, but you will be missing the foundation on which that answer is built. This is the main source of confusion with git.

The better way is to learn git from the inside out. You should first learn about what objects are and how they're stored and identified, and how they relate to each other. You should learn what blobs, trees, and commits actually are, and how they relate to each other, and how commits form a linked list from which a graph of all objects can be derived.

Then you should learn how the ref database gives friendly names like "master" and "feature/foobar" to objects, and how the reflog tracks changes to references over time.

THEN, and only then, should you learn how to use the CLI. Then you can learn about using the staging area to add objects to the database and create commits, and how doing this updates the reflog.

Git makes total sense when you approach it from this angle. Supposedly hard tools like git rebase are totally understandable when you view them with the appropriate foundational knowledge.

Git is a tool which you will reach for hundreds of times a day, every day, for your entire career. Maybe it's worth learning about properly.

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@sir
Gave a course on git to my colleagues the other day and I did precisely that. The plumbing *then* the porcelain

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Eldritch Café

Une instance se voulant accueillante pour les personnes queers, féministes et anarchistes ainsi que pour leurs sympathisant·e·s. Nous sommes principalement francophones, mais vous êtes les bienvenu·e·s quelle que soit votre langue.

A welcoming instance for queer, feminist and anarchist people as well as their sympathizers. We are mainly French-speaking people, but you are welcome whatever your language might be.